The Bosselman’s Pump & Pantry under construction on East 23rd Street in Fremont will be the first to sport the company’s new look.

“We’re calling it our hometown look,” said Stephanie King-Witt, Bosselman’s director of marketing. “This will be the first full-sized store that will have that new look.

“The exterior is going to look different, the interior is going to look a little bit different. It will have a turret on the corner that will actually be part of a coffee bar on the inside. The façade will be a different color and different texture than any of our other stores. It’s a new look that we’re working on for any new buildings that we put up going forward,” she said.

Pump & Pantry is just one of many projects under way in Fremont.

Bosselman’s new store — the 48th in its network, but their first in Fremont — is also going to be the largest in the chain at about 3,100 square feet.

Dirt work is well under way on the site near the Menard’s sign west of U.S. Highway 275.

“Our hope is to open it sometime in March; it kind of depends on the weather, of course,” she said. “I think we’re right on schedule for right now, but that completion date kind of sits on what kind of a winter we end up having.”

King-Witt said locating in Fremont, “is a new opportunity and a great location” for Bosselman’s.

“It’s going to be a great high traffic area, so it’s a nice location for us to serve customers that are out and about,” she said.

Work is also under way just west of the future Pump & Pantry site on an 18,000-square-foot, six-bay strip mall.

Victor Pelster of NPDodge in Omaha, Realtor for the project, said the “Shoppes in Fremont” project is expected to open by next June.

“We started construction now, so we’ll get the shell up over the winter,” Pelster said.

Pelster said about 75 percent of the space has been committed.

The next development on East 23rd St. could be a Pizza Ranch restaurant.

Harlayn Dergriend, who owns the Pizza Ranch in West Point, said his company is in the process of acquiring land, and he would like to see construction start after the first thaw in the spring.

Mild winter weather is allowing workers to make steady progress on the future Butler Machinery Company site northwest of the Christensen Business Park along U.S. Highway 30.

Bob Jensen, chief financial officer and treasurer of Butler Machinery, said a 25,000- to 27,000-square-foot building will offer sales, parts and service on the Challenger and AGCO lines of farm machinery.

“They’ve got all the footings and the floor poured and everything like that. What we’re waiting for now is the steel and the concrete panels to arrive That appears, at this time, to be the January time frame. We’re shooting for hopefully an opening anywhere between April and June of next year,” Jensen said.

The business initially will employ 10 to 12 people, and administrative staff who will oversee Nebraska operations.

The company has 13 locations across the Dakotas. While Fremont is the company’s first Nebraska site, Butler is aiming at other locations in southeastern and south-central Nebraska.

A new 30,000-square-foot shipping building at All Metals Market, 1225 County Road Y, is expected to be ready soon.

“They said the building couldn’t be fabricated and delivered until Jan. 19,” owner Kevin Yount said. “I hope it can beat that, but the nice weather has certainly made it nice to get the cement poured and floor poured and get the foundation done. It’s going to be ready when the building gets here.”

Paving was expected to be completed this week for a new commercial hangar at Fremont Municipal Airport, City Engineer Clark Boschult said.

The hangar itself, leased to Ed Robinson, a Waterloo seed corn dealer, “is pretty far along” with most of the exterior work finished, Boschult said.

The fourth private hangar at the airport, Boschult said at least one other private company is considering building a hangar there.

Providence Place Memory Care, an assisted living center specializing in memory care, has sprouted up at 749 E. 32nd St.

“We’re trying to get it enclosed before the weather. One of these days winter is going to arrive,” said Mark Lamb of Lamb Real Estate.

“We pretty much have the foundation and underground plumbing all in, the floor is poured, and the walls are up,” he said. “They will get it closed in, and then we can work all winter with the goal to have it completed by June 1.”

The single-story, 10,000-square-foot facility will consist of 16 individual apartments with an additional 16 units planned for future expansion.

A ribbon cutting event was held Thursday for the new Advance Auto Parts store at 1624 E. 23rd St. — formerly the site of Whiskey Creek Steakhouse that was razed to make room.

The store employs nine people, including general manager Cody Thielen.

The store is open 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday.