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Obituaries
Harold Russell Hultquist

June 5, 1926 – March 8, 2019

Harold Russell Hultquist, 92, of Fremont died Friday, March 8, 2019, at the Nebraska Medical Center.

Harold was born June 5, 1926, in Dodge City, Kansas, to Sherman and Zella Hultquist. After graduation he worked as a hired hand on several farms, and also helped his father. He joined the Army in 1945 and was discharged in 1947. Harold married Leona Frances Nissen on Aug. 19, 1948, in the Westside Methodist Church near Oakland and were married 67 years. They farmed near Oakland until moving to Fremont in 1977. He worked for Shar-lo Homes in Tekamah for eight years, then worked at Valmont Industries until he retired.

His hobbies included wood working, Senior League bowling, Senior League golf and being a member of the Nebraska Antique Power Association. He worked on small engines and proudly showed off his antique gas-powered Maytag washer at John C. Fremont Days and the Dodge County Fair. He enjoyed driving his 1941 Pontiac Silver Streak the last few years, and won several awards at car shows. Harold participated in 5K, 10K and full marathons starting at the age of 56. He qualified and participated in the Boston Marathon in 1987 at the age of 61, and continued running until age 72.

Survivors: daughters, Barbara Nelson of Lincoln, Jeanne Pritchard of Fremont, Nancy (David) Guill of Wayne, Patsy (David) Kerschinske of Fremont; son, Wayne Hultquist of Fremont; exchange student daughter, Suleka (Santosh) Das of New Jersey; 14 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and 6 great-great-grandchildren; sister, Lorelei Wickstrom of Oakland; brother, John William “Bill” Hultquist of Oakland; sister-in-law, Myra Hultquist of Wichita, Kansas; numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Harold was preceded in death by wife Leona in 2016; parents; brothers, Dewey and Lawrence; sister, Deanna Betts; sister-in-law, Donna Hultquist; brothers-in-law, Don Betts, Kermit Moseman and Jim Wickstrom; and great-granddaughter, Courtney (Henrichson) Fagen.

The funeral will be 10 a.m. Tuesday, March 19, at First United Methodist Church in Fremont. Burial will be at 1:30 p.m. at Westside Cemetery west of Oakland with Military Honors. Memorials may be directed to the family. Visitation will be Monday, March 18, at the Ludvigsen Mortuary Chapel in Fremont from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. with the family present from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Online guestbook at www.ludvigsenmortuary.com.


Obituaries
Dorothy A. Coday

November 22, 1930 – March 12, 2019

Mass of Christian Burial for Dorothy A. Coday, 88, Norfolk, will be 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, March 19, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Norfolk. Rev. Timothy Coday and Rev. Stan Schmit will officiate. Visitation will be Monday from 4-7 p.m. at Home for Funerals on Norfolk Avenue with a Rosary at 7. Burial will be at St. Joseph’s Catholic Cemetery in Atkinson. Home for Funerals is in charge of arrangements.


Columnists
Spiritual Spinach
Long ago, boy heard God speak

It wasn’t the smartest thing I ever did.

I was a freshman at what’s now called Midland University, when I decided to make a quick weekend trip home.

My parents, Glenn and Evelyn, lived clear across the state in Sidney.

From Fremont, it’s a 385-mile trip.

That weekend, I hopped in my little orange-colored car with an Amoco credit card so I could buy gas — and about six cents in my purse.

Everything was fine until I reached Lexington.

Snow was coming down hard and I was still about 180 miles from Sidney. I didn’t have enough money for a hotel and suddenly remembered I hadn’t even called home to tell my parents I was coming.

Please understand, I was a freshman in the late 1970s. We didn’t have cell phones, laptop computers, email or texting.

But restaurants and phone booths had pay phones. You’d put some coins into the phone to make your call.

Or you could dial “0” on the phone and you’d soon hear the voice of an operator, who could help you make a “collect” call.

If the person you called agreed to pay for the call, you could talk to that person. If not, the call ended.

So that day, I stopped at a pizza restaurant in Lexington to use a pay phone.

It was mid-afternoon and only two people — a young blonde and a guy in a motorcycle jacket — were in the restaurant.

Since I literally didn’t have a dime to make a call, I tried to make a collect call to my mom.

But she didn’t answer.

So I tried to call my Grandma Mae to see if she would call my parents and let them know I was trying to get home.

There was just one problem.

My grandma didn’t hear very well.

I didn’t think about that as I told the operator my name and listened to the phone ring.

Grandma picked up the phone.

“Hello,” said the operator. “I have a collect call from Tammy ….”

I could hear Grandma’s voice.

“Hello … Hello?” she started.

The operator tried again: “I have a collect call from Tammy….”

“Betty? …” Grandma asked, starting what seemed like a five-minute guessing game with the name of almost every woman in our family. “Sandy? Debbie? Heidi?”

The operator repeatedly tried to get her message across.

By now, I thought the operator needed an explanation.

“She’s a little hard of hearing,” I said.

The operator had that figured out.

“Yes, I know,” she snapped back.

Poor operator.

Anyway, Grandma finally accepted the call.

“Grandma,” I yelled into the phone. “This is Tammy. I’m coming home.”

“You’re decorating for prom?” she asked.

“No, grandma,” I said. “I’m coming home. Will you call mom and tell her?”

Grandma didn’t seem to be listening.

“Mabel Johnkosky died, you know,” she said.

I had no idea who she was talking about.

“I’m sorry, grandma. But could you tell mom….”

Grandma stopped me mid-sentence.

“Well, actually, she died 10 years ago, but her son just died recently. I’m going to clip the story out of the newspaper and give it to your dad,” grandma said, adding, “Well, that’s all dear. Goodbye.”

I heard the click and then the dial tone.

Hoping grandma somehow understood me and would call my mom, I headed toward the door.

The blonde and the guy in the motorcycle jacket were staring at me.

Years later, I smile as I remember that conversation. I realize we can have perfectly good hearing — and still not get the message.

And I’m reminded of a young boy, who lived centuries ago.

He had good hearing, but just didn’t know who was talking to him.

Found in the Old Testament, the account begins by telling about Israel’s spiritual condition.

At this point, it isn’t so good. The people aren’t paying attention to God’s rules, which perhaps is why the Lord is being pretty quiet.

The Scriptures record that, “…In those days, a word from the Lord was rare; there were not many visions.” (1 Samuel 3:1)

Yet God decides to talk to a boy named Samuel.

When our story begins, it is night and Eli, the priest, is lying down in the temple.

Samuel is lying down, too.

The Lord calls to Samuel.

“Here I am,” Samuel answers, running to Eli.

The boy thinks the priest has called him.

But Eli hasn’t called Samuel.

“Go back and lie down,” Eli says.

So Samuel does.

God will call Samuel twice more and the boy will run to Eli two more times before the priest realizes the Lord is calling the child.

Eli tells Samuel to lie down again and gives these instructions: “If he calls to you, say, ‘Speak, Lord, for your servant is listening.’”

Samuel lies down.

Then, the Scriptures say: “The Lord came and stood there, calling as at the other times, ‘Samuel! Samuel!’”

Samuel is about to get quite a message regarding Eli and his family.

Eli’s two sons, Hophni and Phinehas, are priests, but they’re immoral scoundrels with no regard for the Lord — and their dad hasn’t restrained them.

Another man of God has told Eli what will happen to them in the future — and it’s not pretty.

The Lord confirms this to Samuel.

The next day, Eli presses Samuel to tell him what God said, so Samuel tells him everything.

God is with Samuel as he grows up and he becomes an attested prophet of the Lord throughout all Israel.

Both of Eli’s wicked sons die in battle on the same day and the enemy army — the Philistines — capture the Ark of the Covenant. When Eli — then 98 years old — hears the news, he falls over and dies.

Not a great ending.

The Ark of the Covenant will be returned to Israel, however. Samuel eventually goes on to anoint a young shepherd named David, who will become king of that nation.

David also will become an ancestor of Jesus.

Centuries later, Jesus will heal a deaf man.

Can you imagine how beautiful it must have been to hear Jesus speak?

Recently, a woman told me she’s audibly heard the voice of our Lord, and that it’s wonderful.

That hasn’t happened to me, but the Lord has spoken to me through his word and the Holy Spirit has brought Christ’s words to my heart — right when I needed them most.

Discerning the voice of God is an ongoing process, but I love the words of Christ, who said:

“My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they will never perish, and no one will snatch them out of my hand.” (John 10:27)

God is good at protecting us.

By the way, I made it home just fine all those years ago.

I left the restaurant and was surprised to find that the snow had stopped. The sky was cloudy, but the road was clear all the way home.

My mother met me at the door, when I reached our small white house.

“I’m sorry I didn’t answer the telephone,” Mom said. “I was in the bathtub and I figured it was just grandma on the phone and that she’d call back.”

Grandma must have heard me after all.

And in the future, I certainly brought more than six cents and a credit card for gas along on a trip.

A postscript. Now that I’m a grandmother, I hope my grandson, Matt, never has such a hard time trying to get a message across to me and, if he does, I hope he has a good laugh.

Tammy Real-McKeighan is news editor of the Fremont Tribune. She writes a weekly spiritual column.


Local
Friday calendar

Today

Cosmopolitan 100 Service Club, 7 a.m., Fremont Eagles Club.

HomeStore, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., 701 E. Dodge St., Fremont. The HomeStore sells donated items at discounted prices. Proceeds support the mission of Fremont Area Habitat for Humanity.

Airport Advisory Board meeting, 8:15 a.m., Fremont Municipal Airport, 1203 W. 23rd St. The meeting is open to the public.

Al-Anon meeting, 9:30 a.m., Chapter 5 Club front room, 136 N. Main St., Fremont.

Community Closet, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Uniquely Yours Stability Support, 240 N. Main St., Fremont. The cost is $5 to fill a bag. There is no limit of how many bags you can buy. For more information, call 402-727-8977.

Fremont Community Breastfeeding Support Group, 10-11 a.m., Three Rivers Health Department conference room, Fremont.

Storytime, 10-10:30 a.m., Keene Memorial Library auditorium, 1030 N. Broad St., Fremont.

Baby and toddler time, 11 a.m. to noon, Keene Memorial Library auditorium.

Alcoholics Anonymous 12x12 study, noon, Chapter 5 Club, Fremont

Fremont Rotary Club, noon, Fremont Golf Club, N. Somers Ave.

Knights of Columbus Lenten fish fry, 5-7:30 p.m., St. Patrick’s Auditorium, 435 N. Union St., Fremont. The all-you-can-eat meal includes: fresh Pollock, baked beans, coleslaw, cheese pizza, shrimp, cornbread, tea, coffee and lemonade. The cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children. Beer also will be available for purchase.

St. Francis Borgia Catholic Church fish fry, 5-8 p.m., St. Francis Borgia Catholic Church, 2005 Davis Drive, Blair. Beer-battered fried fish, baked fish and fried shrimp will be served with baked potatoes, fries, hushpuppies, coleslaw, salad, soup, bread, dessert, pop, wine and beer. The cost is $11 for adults and $10 for seniors. Kids 12 and under can pick from macaroni and cheese, cheese pizza or fish for $5. Takeout meals will be available.

Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 5:15 p.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Cedar Bluffs Sons of the American Legion Post 158 fish fry, 5:30-8 p.m., American Legion Post 158, Cedar Bluffs. Pollock will be served along with beans, macaroni and cheese, coleslaw, pickles, bread and chips. The American Legion Auxiliary will be selling desserts.

St. Thomas Aquinas Knights of Columbus Council 3736 Lenten fish fry, 5:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., St. Charles Parish Center, North Bend. The menu will include Alaskan Pollock, round potato fries, cole slaw, macaroni and cheese, veggie baked beans, marbled rye bread, southwest Macaroni and condiments. Gluten-free breading is available upon request. Cost of the all-you-can-eat meals are $10 for adults (ages 14 and up), $5 for children ages 7-13, free for children 6 and under, and $32 for a family deal (includes 18-year-old in high school and under). Takeout meals will be available.

St. Thomas Aquinas Knights of Columbus Council 3736 Lenten fish fry, 5:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., St. Charles Parish Center, North Bend. The menu will include Alaskan Pollock, round potato fries, cole slaw, macaroni and cheese, veggie baked beans, marbled rye bread, southwest Macaroni and condiments. Gluten-free breading is available upon request. Cost of the all-you-can-eat meals are $10 for adults (ages 14 and up), $5 for children ages 7-13, free for children 6 and under, and $32 for a family deal (includes 18-year-old in high school and under). Takeout meals will be available.

Izaak Walton Lenten Fish Fry, 6-8 p.m., Fremont Izaak Walton Park, 6-8 p.m., Main Lodge, 2560 W. Military Ave., Fremont. Pollock will be served three different ways along with fries, coleslaw, bread and dessert. Chicken strips also will be available. Tickets are $10 per person and include two trips through the food line and a drink ticket. Everyone is welcome.

“Newsies,” 7:30 p.m., Fremont High School’s Nell McPherson Theatre.

Al-Anon meeting, 8-9 p.m., Chapter 5 Club back room, Fremont. This support group is for families and friends of alcoholics.

Narcotics Anonymous Freedom Works Group, 8 p.m., Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Education Building, west of the church, 1440 E. Military Ave., Fremont. Enter through the rear door.

Alcoholics Anonymous candlelight meeting, 10 p.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Saturday

HomeStore, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., 701 E. Dodge St., Fremont. The HomeStore sells donated items at discounted prices. Proceeds support the mission of Fremont Area Habitat for Humanity.

Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 10 a.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Storytime, 11-11:30 a.m., Keene Memorial Library auditorium, Fremont.

Alcoholics Anonymous women’s heart to heart group, noon, Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 5:15 p.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Izaak Walton Family Dinner, 6:30 p.m., Fremont Izaak Walton Park, 2560 W. Military Ave., Fremont. Corn beef and cabbage or pot roast, mashed potatoes and gravy, carrots, salad, coffee or juice, and a dessert will be served. Dinner is $8 for adults and $5 for kids. Twenty free games of bingo will follow dinner. For more information, call or text Kim Chapman at 402-620-1732.

“Newsies,” 7:30 p.m., Fremont High School’s Nell McPherson Theatre.

Narcotics Anonymous Lie Is Dead Group, 8 p.m., Care Corps, 723 N. Broad St., Fremont.

Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 10:30 p.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Sunday

Alcoholics Anonymous Happy Sober Sunday Group, 9 a.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 10 a.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Narcotics Anonymous Seekers of Serenity Group, 10:30 a.m., Care Corps, 723 N. Broad St., Fremont.

Corned beef and cabbage, noon, Fremont Eagles Club, 649 N. Main St. The event also will include musical entertainment by Down Memory Lane from 2-4 p.m. Proceeds will go to the Fraternal Order of Eagles’ cancer fund. Everyone is welcome.

Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, 5:15 p.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.

Bob Olsen’s 90th birthday party and concert, 7 p.m., Fremont Opera House, 541 N. Broad St. A variety of musicians will take part in the event. The cost is $15 per ticket. Tickets are available online at http://fremontoperahouse.org or at Sampter’s, 517 N. Main St., or by calling 402-720-2332.

7th AVE, 7 p.m., Fremont High School’s Nell McPherson Theatre. The concert is part of the Fremont-Midland Entertainment Series. Non-member adult tickets are $20 per show. Midland University faculty and students are free. Student tickets are $10 while children under age 10 are admitted free.

Narcotics Anonymous Freedom Works Group, 7 p.m., Good Shepherd Lutheran Church Education Building, west of the church, 1440 E. Military Ave., Fremont. Enter through the rear door.

Alcoholics Anonymous Sunday speaker, 7:30 p.m., Chapter 5 Club, Fremont.


Local
Izaak Walton chapter plans family dinner

The Jessie Benton Fremont Izaak Walton Chapter will be hosting a family dinner at 6:30 p.m. Saturday at Fremont Izaak Walton Park, 2560 W. Military Ave.

Corned beef and cabbage or pot roast will be served along with mashed potatoes and gravy, carrots, salad, coffee or juice, and a dessert. The cost is $ for adults and $5 for kids.

Twenty free games of bingo will follow dinner.

For more information, text or call Kim Chapman Thompson at 402-620-1732.


Local
spotlighttop story
Relay for Life plans Taco Night

Could buying a taco help in the fight against cancer?

The public is invited to find out.

On March 21, the American Cancer Society Relay for Life leadership team is hosting Taco Night. The event is set from 5-7:30 p.m. in the fellowship hall of Salem Lutheran Church, 401 E. Military Ave., in Fremont.

The menu includes the choice of a taco salad or softshell taco with choice of toppings, desserts and a drink.

Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for children ages 5 to 12 and free for children under age 5.

The tickets may be purchased in advance from Relay for Life participants, at Pinnacle Bank (next to Taco Bell) in Fremont or at the door.

“Taco Night was started as a new and fun way to raise funds to further our mission,” said Diane Wilson of Relay for Life of Dodge County. “We hope people will attend to help support our fight against cancer, but also to enjoy an evening of great food and fellowship with others.”

The American Cancer Society Relay for Life is a community celebration and represents hope in that those lost to cancer will not be forgotten, that those who face cancer will be supported, and that one day, cancer will be eliminated, the society said in a prepared statement.

Net proceeds from this event will help the cancer society fund research, educational programs, and advocacy and patient services.

The 21st annual Relay for Life of Dodge County will take place from 4-11 p.m. June 8 on the Midland University campus in Fremont.

“An Old-Fashioned Picnic” is the theme for this year’s event.

For more about the local event, please contact Stephanie Stephenson at 402-398-0774 or find the group on Facebook or visit its website at www.relayforlife.org/dodgecone or email rfldodge1@gmail.com. Those interested in learning more also may call 1-800-227-2345 or visit www.relayforlife.org for additional information.