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Robert Williamson

Williamson

A Snyder man who physically assaulted a 21-year-old woman and killed a kitten in front of her was sentenced to three years in prison on a misdemeanor third degree domestic abuse charge and a class IIIA felony animal cruelty charge.

The man, Robert Williamson, 41, pleaded guilty to the charges on July 30, and was sentenced on Monday as part of a joint agreement between the state and his defense attorney, Kenny Jacobs. He received the maximum sentence of one year on the misdemeanor abuse charge and three years on the animal cruelty charge.

The charges will be run concurrently, and Williamson has received credit for 88 days previously served. He will also receive nine months of post release supervision.

Williamson was arrested in May in connection to a complaint of an animal abuse incident at a Snyder residence, according to a police affidavit.

According to the affidavit, Williamson struck the 21-year-old victim multiple times, causing two black eyes and a bloody nose. During the assault, he also stomped on two kittens, yelling “why won’t you die?” as he did so. One of the kittens died and the other was treated at the Downtown Animal Clinic in Fremont and treated for severe injuries, the affidavit says.

The incident was reported on May 23, three days after it occurred, and police had photographic evidence of the victim’s injuries. After an interview with Williamson, police noted that he had swollen knuckles and scratches on his arm consistent with cat scratches.

Court records show that Williamson was also charged with habitual criminal, which extends sentences for repeat offenders, but that charge was ultimately dropped.

In other district court news from Monday:

  • Clinton Thornton, 47, of Fremont, was sentenced to a year in prison on a class IIIA felony of making terroristic threats.Thornton approached a woman who was in her car leaving her place of work, claiming to want to discuss a personal issue. He was holding a sweatshirt and what appeared to be a black handgun wrapped inside it. He told the victim that if she did not allow him into the car, he would go inside her place of employment and shoot people.

Other misdemeanor charges, including a class IIIA domestic assault charge, were ultimately dropped.

Thornton’s defense attorney, Leo Eskey, argued that Thornton was a “classic alcoholic” who had recently started to seek effective treatment following a recent near-death experience. Deputy County Attorney Emily Beamis argued that the treatment hadn’t come until significantly later in the case, and that the victim was fearing Thornton’s release. District Court Judge Geoffrey Hall said that Thornton’s record was bad, and ultimately agreed with Beamis, stating that Thornton’s recent admission into treatment was “too little too late.”

He also received 18 months of post release supervision, which Hall argued would ensure that Thornton could follow through with the treatment that he started.

  • Jason Buck, 34, was sentenced to 20 months in prison after pleading no contest to possession methamphetamine and admitting to violating a prior probation. Buck was arrested in July after he failed to show up to a probation-related appointment. A subsequent probation search of his residence yielded the discovery of drugs and drug paraphernalia. The incident put him in violation of a probation that had been assigned in February 2017. Buck vowed to turn his life around, saying that he was “ready to accept the consequences of his action,” and that, as a soon-to-be father, he “thinks it’s about time that he starts taking his drug addiction seriously.”
  • Brenda Hernandez Calderon, 20, was sentenced to a year in prison along with nine months of post release supervision after she failed to appear for a scheduled appointment for probation related to a previous charge.
  • A date was set for a jury trial in the case of Diango Flores, 27, for Nov. 7. Flores is facing charges of possession of a controlled substance, driving without an operator’s license and possession or use of drug paraphernalia.
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