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Continuing appeals for action and assistance in the wake of flooding past and almost certain to come again rained down Monday from rural Nebraska during Gov. Pete Ricketts' monthly radio call-in show.

A caller from Tekamah said her family will not be able to plant a crop for the first time since 1956 because of lingering flood damage from earlier this year.

A caller from a farm near Cedar Rapids said the U.S. Postal Service has discontinued mail delivery service there because of damage to a county bridge that probably won't be repaired for a year.

"We're all pretty weary," the caller identified as Donnette in Tekamah told the governor.

Ricketts told callers he's determined to continue working with three other governors in the Missouri River basin to "come up with solutions" that would help control or minimize future flooding.

With another cold, wet winter expected to lie ahead, Ricketts said the governors are committed to "keep the pressure on the Corps (of Engineers) to move as fast as we can" on flood-control measures that might prevent or diminish future flooding.

The Corps manages river flow from a number of dams, including Gavins Point Dam along the Nebraska-South Dakota border.

Last March, heavy rain and snowfall combined with dislodged ice flows to devastate Nebraska with more than a billion dollars in flood damage.  

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Iowa, Kansas and Missouri also suffered heavy damage.

Donnette in Tekamah pointed to what she described as "Corps' mismanagement of our river" and suggested that fish and wildlife protections have exacerbated the problem.

The Corps wants a three- to five-year flood-control study, she said, but "our farmers can't sustain that."

Rita, the caller from rural Cedar Rapids, said she is able to access her mail by going to the post office in town now. But if delivery to the farm has been suspended until the bridge is repaired, she said, it is questionable whether it would ever be resumed.

The damage from this year's flooding and the likelihood that more is almost certain to occur in coming months has been a major topic of concern on the governor's call-in radio shows.

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Reach the writer at 402-473-7248 or dwalton@journalstar.com.

On Twitter @LJSDon.

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