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President Joe Biden is expected to designate his first national monument in Colorado next week. The president will be using his powers to conserve a World War 2-era alpine warfare training camp whose graduates went on to help found the U.S. ski industry. The designation of Camp Hale as a national monument will be an election year gift to Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet, who pushed for Biden to make the designation after legislation to conserve the camp and other areas stalled in Congress. Biden has expanded the boundaries of other national monuments but has yet to create his own.

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The owner of a U.S. flag signed by quarterback Tom Brady has sued the New England Patriots, saying the team caused irreparable damage to the flag by improperly displaying it at the team's hall of fame at Gillette Stadium. The suit filed Wednesday in Boston contends that after the flag had been on display for a couple of months, Brady’s signature written in blue Sharpie had significantly faded, which reduced the flag’s value by as much as $1 million. A Patriots spokesperson said Thursday that the team had no immediate comment. The flag flew over the now-closed Foxboro Stadium on Dec. 22, 2001. Daniel Vitale, of Hampstead, New Hampshire, bought the flag in 2020.

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Interior Secretary Deb Haaland has announced an expansion of a National Park Service historical site dedicated to the massacre by U.S. troops of more than 200 Native Americans in what is now southeastern Colorado. Haaland, the first Native American to lead a U.S. Cabinet agency, made the announcement during a solemn ceremony at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historical Site about 170 miles southeast of Denver. The move marked the latest step taken by Haaland to bring action to issues important to Native Americans in her role as Interior Secretary. The site is where U.S. Cavalry ambushed hundreds of Native Americans in 1864. More than 230 Cheyenne and Arapaho died. Congress condemned the unprovoked attack.

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Wildlife agencies in the U.S. are finding elevated levels of a class of toxic chemicals in game animals such as deer. The discovery is prompting health advisories in parts of the country where hunting and fishing are ways of life and key pieces of the economy. Authorities have detected the high levels of PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, in deer in several states, including Michigan and Maine. PFAS chemicals are industrial compounds used in numerous products, such as cookware and clothing. They are sometimes called “forever chemicals” for their persistence in the environment. The discovery of PFAS in animals hunted for sport and food represents a new challenge.

Some low-income communities of color around the United States are learning to tackle extreme neighborhood heat fueled by climate change through nonprofit programs that educate and engage. Community leaders are taking neighborhood health into their own hands by opening cooling centers, organizing tree plantings and teaching young people how to protect their vulnerable neighborhoods from the effects of extreme heat as heat waves grow in frequency, length and intensity. An Urban Heat Leadership Academy in Phoenix helps leaders with small grants to plant fruit trees or a ‘cool corridor’ of greenery. A Philadelphia initiative raises awareness with public art.

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Motorcycle-riding gunmen have killed a longtime radio commentator in metropolitan Manila in the latest attack on a member of the media in the Philippines, considered one of the world's most dangerous countries for journalists. Police say Percival Mabasa was driving his vehicle when two men on a motorcycle approached and shot him twice in the head. Police say they are trying to identify the attackers and determine their motive. Mabasa was critical of former President Rodrigo Duterte, who oversaw a deadly crackdown on illegal drugs, and his successor, Ferdinand Marcos Jr., the son of a dictator who was ousted in a 1986 pro-democracy uprising. Media watchdogs condemned the killing.

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A judge has barred the enforcement of an executive order signed by Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney last week banning guns and deadly weapons from the city’s indoor and outdoor recreation spaces, including parks, basketball courts and pools. The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that Common Pleas Judge Joshua Roberts on Monday ordered Philadelphia “permanently enjoined” from enforcing the order. The Gun Owners of America, on behalf of several state residents, filed a lawsuit immediately after Kenny’s order, which was the latest attempt by Philadelphia officials to regulate guns inside city limits despite a state law barring any city or county from passing gun-control measures.

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Far-right conservative Andy Ogles has largely vanished from the public arena after securing the Republican nomination in a reconfigured congressional district cutting into left-leaning Nashville, Tennessee. Ogles successfully emerged in August as the winner of a crowded nine-way primary race for the state’s 5th Congressional District. He quickly set a bombastic tone in his victory speech, declaring that “we’re at war” in the fight “to get back to honoring God and country.” But in the weeks following, Ogles has shied away from public events and posted sparingly to social media. Most recently, Democratic opponent Heidi Campbell accused Ogles of refusing invitations to seven debates and forums.

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It was as much art fair as fashion show for designer Stella McCartney, who put on an art-infused spring collection at Paris Fashion Week on Monday that vibrated with flashes of color. Iconic Japanese contemporary artist Yoshitomo Nara collaborated on the designs showcased at Paris’ Pompidou Center Modern Art Museum. The display also pioneered the use of regenerative cotton. At Thom Browne, it was Versailles meets the Ming Dynasty for the U.S. designer’s eccentric but luxuriant ready-to-wear. His floor sweeping, silken A-line gowns regally ushered past guests inside the ornate salons of the Paris Opera.   At Lanvin, designer Bruno Sialelli was in a low-key mood, producing a saleable spring collection that featured neat, unfussy looks.

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It only took two decades, but a rare and endangered turtle species has finally bred at the San Diego Zoo. Zoo officials on Monday announced the arrival of 41 tiny Indian narrow-headed softshell turtle hatchlings. Conservationists from the San Diego Wildlife Alliance had for 20 years closely monitored three adult turtles for any indications of breeding. Officials say it can be an extremely prolonged process as the turtles can take close to 10 years to even reach sexual maturity. Two nests were found over the summer containing 41 eggs. All survived. Officials say the hatchings make the alliance the first accredited conservation organization in North America to hatch the endangered turtles.

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Hundreds of hot air balloons lifted off Saturday, marking the start of an annual fiesta that has drawn pilots and spectators from across the globe to New Mexico's high desert for 50 years now. The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta is one of the most photographed events in the world. It has become an economic driver for the state's largest city and a rare — and colorful — opportunity for enthusiasts to gather. Three of the original pilots who participated in the first fiesta in 1972 are among this year's attendees.

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Far-right leader Giorgia Meloni is vowing to put Italy's national interests first in tackling soaring energy costs. Meloni on Saturday made her first public appearance since her party won the most votes in Italy's national election last weekend. She addressed farmers at an agricultural fair in Milan sponsored by Italy’s influential Coldiretti farm lobby. Meloni said if her government follows Germany in taking a domestic approach to Europe's energy woes, it's not because she's a populist, but rather “lucid.” Germany has refused to back a European price cap on gas, as Italy and other countries have sought. Her appearance came as Russia’s Gazprom utility informed gas giant ENI that no natural gas would be delivered to Italy on Saturday, further tightening supplies.

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Abigail E. Disney has been critical of the company that bears her name before. But for the first time, Disney, the granddaughter of co-founder Roy O. Disney, has put her views into the medium the Mouse House was built on: a movie. In the new documentary “The American Dream and Other Fairy Tales,” Disney argues that the Walt Disney Co. has lost its moral compass. Disney lays out a harsh portrait of the company, particularly in regard to pay inequity and the struggles of some theme park employees to sustain their families on their pay. The company, she says, “has lost the plot.” A spokesperson for the company says its employees are “the heart and soul of Disney.”

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Marilyn Monroe’s on-screen costumes are almost as iconic as her. Suffice it to say, “Blonde” costume designer Jennifer Johnson felt an enormous amount of pressure to get those dresses right for the Netflix film, streaming Wednesday. “Blonde” may be a fictionalized version of her story, but the costumes are ripped from reality. The vast majority of the frocks Ana de Armas wears in the film, from the white pleated “Seven Year Itch” number to the pink “Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend” gown, are recreations that Johnson and her team had to make without the actual reference garment on hand.

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Friend or foe? On the streets of Tokyo and Beijing, the ties between Japan and China remain complicated and often contradictory. Chinese urbanites slurp “ramen” soup noodles in a two-story restaurant row made to look like Tokyo’s narrow alleyways. Japanese flock to a festival in Tokyo to try Chinese dumplings. But critical views are on the rise 50 years after the two Asian countries normalized relations as part of the process that brought Communist China into the international fold. The two are marking the anniversary Thursday of the agreement to establish diplomatic relations in 1972.

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After a Willem de Kooning painting worth millions was brazenly stolen in 1985 from an Arizona museum, the staff clung to the hope that it would turn up one day. But nobody could have predicted “Woman-Ochre” would find its way back through the kindness of strangers in a neighboring state. The 1955 oil painting by the Dutch-American abstract expressionist is finally back home. It will be the centerpiece of an entire exhibition opening Oct. 8. The whole ordeal of the theft and its return via New Mexico will be chronicled in the show. The painting will be in the same spot it was stolen from — but under a case.

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A drag performer has filed a defamation lawsuit against a far-right blogger he accuses of releasing a doctored video that falsely made it look as if he had exposed himself to children. Eric Posey filed the lawsuit this week alleging his reputation was damaged after Summer Bushnell released the video on her blog and told her followers that Posey had committed a felony during a Pride festival in Coeur d'Alene. The video was widely shared online, but a police investigation found Posey remained fully clothed during the performance. Bushnell denied the defamation allegations in a telephone interview Wednesday.

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Paris Fashion Week roared into full gear with atmospherics and palpable anticipation of Balmain’s evening fashion festival spectacular. The French luxury fashion house is hosting a star-studded charity concert featuring the latest fashions, members of the public and secret celebrity performances on Wednesday. During the day, Courreges showed its latest designs on a circular runway featured a falling column of sand at its center that evoked the sands of time. Belgian fashion master Dries Van Noten was back on form for spring with a typically unpindownable collection held together only by the aesthetic of its looseness. Meanwhile, Jun Takahashi’s Japanese brand Undercover went slashing mad this season.

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Some historical battle re-enactors in New York are holding their musket fire because of worries over the state’s new gun rules. The law that went into effect this month declares parks, government property and a long list of other “sensitive” places off limits to guns. The law was geared more semiautomatic pistols than flintlock weapons, but re-enactors who fear they risk arrest if they publicly re-stage long-ago battles from the colonial era to the Civil War are staying off the field. Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul’s administration insists that historical battle re-enactments are still OK, and some have taken place this month.

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Interior Secretary Deb Haaland has joined House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn in visiting a rural South Carolina school that is now part of a National Park Service program to safeguard institutions connected to the Supreme Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision declaring segregated schools unconstitutional. Legislation signed by President Joe Biden in May added two South Carolina schools to the Brown v. Board of Education National Historical Park. They are Scott’s Branch High School, a so-called equalization school for Black students created just miles from Summerton High School, which served only white students. Haaland and Clyburn both spoke about the importance of preserving and learning from America’s history.

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