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A surge of anti-Jewish vitriol spread by celebrities is stoking fears that public figures are normalizing hate and ramping up the risk of violence. Former President Donald Trump hosted a Holocaust-denying white supremacist at Mar-a-Lago. The rapper Ye expressed love for Adolf Hitler in an interview. Basketball star Kyrie Irving appeared to promote an antisemitic film on social media. Those are just a few recent examples of influential people abusing their platforms to amplify antisemitism in a way that has been taboo for decades in the U.S. Some people say the incidents harken back to a darker time in America when powerful people routinely spread conspiracy theories about Jews with impunity.

In 2015, Aaron Rodgers throws a 61-yard touchdown pass to Richard Rodgers with no time left to give the Green Bay Packers a 27-23 comeback vic…

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The camel batted her eyelashes and flashed a toothy smile for the television cameras at the Mzayen World Cup. The camel pageant was being held in the Qatari desert about 15 miles (25 kilometers) away from Doha and soccer’s World Cup. The pageant is a cross between the Westminster Dog Show and the Miss America Pageant. The winner was Nazaa’a is a majestic light-haired creature that overcame several preliminary rounds and hundreds of other camels to win the pageant at Qatar Camel Mzayen Club on Friday.

The Buffalo Bills finally have a win over a divisional opponent -- and it couldn’t come at a better time. Buffalo’s 24-10 victory over New England on Thursday kicked off a critical December stretch for the Bills. After going 0-2 in the division to start the season, the win over the Patriots came in the first of three consecutive games against AFC East opponents. Turning things around in the division is crucial for the Bills if they hope to win their third straight division title. The Bills (9-3) are looking to win three consecutive AFC East titles for the first time since a four-season stretch from 1988-91.

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Police in Texas have announced an arrest in last month’s shooting death of the performer Takeoff. Houston police said Friday that 33-year-old Patrick Xavier Clark was charged with murder and has been arrested in connection with the rapper’s death. Born Kirsnick Khari Ball, Takeoff was the youngest member of Migos, the Grammy-nominated rap trio from suburban Atlanta that also featured his uncle Quavo and cousin Offset. Police have said the 28-year-old was fatally shot outside a bowling alley after a private party. Police said Friday that the shooting followed a dispute over a game of dice, but that Takeoff was not involved and was an innocent bystander.

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Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper and his real estate company are being scrutinized in a criminal investigation. The probe is examining whether they misused any public money in their failed effort to build a new practice facility for the NFL team. in South Carolina. The York County Sheriff’s Office says state agents and local prosecutors are involved in the probe, which does not mean any crime occured. Tepper’s company GT Real Estate is denying any criminal wrongdoing. It suggests the probe could be timed to disrupt a settlement the team reached agreeing to repay York County more than $21 million, roughly what it took in sales tax revenue to build access roads.

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The College Football Playoff will include 12 teams, starting with the 2024 season. An expansion plan that was crafted for two years and haggled over for another 18 months finally cleared all the obstacles needed to go from idea to reality. The CFP announced Thursday that the current four-team system would be tripling in size. There are still a few more details to work out, like exact dates of some of the games, but college football is two years away from another dramatic change to its postseason.

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About 8,000 American troops watch over the airspace of the Middle East from a major air base run by Qatar as World Cup fans throng stadiums in the energy-rich nation. Al-Udeid Air Base was built on a flat stretch of desert about 20 miles (30 kilometers) southwest of Qatari capital Doha. The base once was considered so sensitive that American military officers identified it as only being somewhere “in southwest Asia.” The sprawling hub is now Qatar’s strategic gem. It showcases the Gulf Arab emirate’s tight security partnership with the United States,. Washington considers Doha a major non-NATO ally.

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China's professional basketball league has fined former NBA star Jeremy Lin for making “inappropriate remarks” about quarantine facilities for his Chinese team. That comes as the government tries to suppress protests against anti-virus controls that are among the world's most stringent. More cities eased restrictions following protests last weekend in Shanghai and other areas in which some crowds called for President Xi Jinping to resign. The China Basketball Association says Lin was fined $1,400 for his remarks on social media about a hotel where his team stayed before a game. The news outlet The Paper said he complained about workout facilities. Phone calls to his team, the Loong Lions, weren't answered.

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In 2002, Oakland’s Tim Brown and Jerry Rice take turns rewriting the NFL record book in a 26-20 win over the New York Jets. See more sports mo…

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The Prince and Princess of Wales have visited a green technology startup incubator in suburban Boston and a nonprofit that gives young people the tools to stay out jail and away from violence. William and Kate are in the United States for their first overseas visit since the death of Queen Elizabeth II. On Thursday, they heard about solar-powered autonomous boats and low-carbon cement at the incubator Greentown Labs. The royal couple’s trip comes as they look to foster new ways to address climate change. It culminates Friday with the prince’s signature Earthshot Prize, a global competition aimed at finding new ways to tackle climate change.

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The College Football Playoff says it will expand to a 12-team event starting in 2024. The announcement came after the Rose Bowl agreed to amend its contract for the 2024 and 2025 seasons. That was the last hurdle CFP officials needed cleared to expand the four-team format. The expansion is expected to produce about $450 million in additional gross revenue for the conferences and schools that participate. The plan to expand the playoff was unveiled publicly in June 2021 and it took 18 months of haggling and delays to finally complete.

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Florida backup quarterback Jalen Kitna has been released from jail on $80,000 bond a day after he was arrested on five child pornography charges that police say included images images of a man having sex with a young girl. A judge set the bond and as conditions for Kitna’s release ordered him not to have any unsupervised contact with minors and not to have any internet access. Kitna sobbed into his hands when his parents, including former NFL quarterback Jon Kitna, address the court during a 75-minute appearance. Jon and Jennifer Kitna said they would supervise their 19-year-old son back home in Burleson, Texas.

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Japan scored twice early in the second half to come from behind to defeat Spain 2-1 in a result that put both teams into the last 16 of the World Cup. Ao Tanaka scored the winning goal from close range early in the second half. It took about two minutes for video review officials to confirm the ball hadn’t gone out of bounds before the goal. Álvaro Morata scored first for Spain in the 11th minute at Khalifa International Stadium. But Japan rallied after halftime. Ritsu Doan equalized in the 48th with a left-footed shot from outside the box. And Tanaka added the second one three minutes later. Germany was eliminated from the tournament even with a 4-2 win over Costa Rica in the other Group E match. A victory by Costa Rica would have eliminated Spain.

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Amazon CEO Andy Jassy has said the company does not have plans to stop selling the antisemitic film that gained notoriety recently after Brooklyn Nets guard Kyrie Irving tweeted out an Amazon link to it. Pressure has been mounting on Amazon to stop selling the film or add a disclaimer to the documentary and the related book that it sells on its site. Jassy addressed the company's handling of the issue at the New York Times’ DealBook Summit in New York City. He says Amazon is a retailer of content to millions of customers with different viewpoints, and it has to allow access to those viewpoints even if they're objectionable.

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Germany was eliminated from the group stage of the World Cup for the second tournament in a row. The four-time champions beat Costa Rica 4-2 but it wasn’t enough to advance to the round of 16. Japan’s 2-1 victory over Spain allowed both of those teams to advance instead. The Japanese team finished at the top of the group. Germany also exited early while playing as defending champions at the last World Cup.

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Former NFL wide receiver Antonio Brown is wanted on a battery charge in Tampa stemming from a domestic incident. Police say the 34-year-old Brown was involved in a verbal altercation with a woman at a home in Tampa on Monday. The report says Brown threw a shoe at the victim, attempted to evict her from the home and locked her out. Brown faces a court-issued warrant for his arrest. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers released Brown in early January after he left the field mid-game and complained about his playing time.

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Morocco is the Arab world’s last hope at the first World Cup ever to be held in the Middle East. The fractured region is rallying around the North African nation after its 2-1 win against Canada that advanced Morocco to the knockout stage of the tournament for the first time since 1986. Morocco’s success sparked angry street riots in Belgium after a match earlier this week but on Thursday triggered an outpouring of joy in the Arab world where local teams are often underdogs. A similar rush of regional goodwill followed Saudi Arabia’s shock win against two-time World Cup winner Argentina last week.

The latest lawsuit alleging widespread misconduct across competitive cheerleading says officials permitted two choregraphers to continue working with young athletes after they were investigated for sexual abuse. Twenty plaintiffs have now brought allegations against various coaches since the founder of an elite South Carolina cheerleading gym reportedly killed himself in late August amid an investigation into abuse. Federal complaints filed in Ohio and five other states throughout the Southeast accuse the sport’s governing bodies and leading competitive institutions of failing to protect underage athletes.

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